FREE SHIPPING on NOAA POD Charts

Cape Hatteras, NC NOAA POD Chart 11520

Now you get FREE SHIPPING on NOAA POD Charts on any order over $100!

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation Print on Demand (POD) nautical charts are produced under the authority of the National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA is the national hydrographic office for the United States of America. The data from which these POD chart are produced is certified by NOAA for navigation use. POD charts meet the requirements for the mandatory carriage of nautical charts established by the U.S. Coast Guard and published in Titles 33 and 46, Code of Federal Regulations, including the requirements for updating.

Williams & Heintz Map offers the POD Charts on two durable and water resistant kinds of paper:

24 lb. JCP E-20 High Wet Strength Map Paper, a white paper with a lithographic finish that is made to be used out in the elements. This economical paper is fully functional even when wet.

36 lb. JCP E-50 Chart Paper, genuine 50% cotton nautical chart paper, the same kind of paper as the lithographically printed charts that mariners are accustomed to.

NOAA has authorized Williams & Heintz Map Corporation to sell NOAA’s paper nautical charts that are printed when the customer orders them, or “on demand.” The information on the charts is still maintained by NOAA, and the charts are corrected with Notices to Mariners up to the week of purchase.

We print the charts at Super Fine – 1440 x 720 DPI, up to 64 inches wide, on a G7 calibrated wide-format printer.

Williams & Heintz uses no toxic solvent inks or dangerous UV processes.

Williams & Heintz Map is First FAA Approved Print Provider

Williams & Heintz is excited to announce that we are now an FAA Approved Print Porovider  VFR and EnRoute Charts.  We are looking forward to working with all of FAA’s current Chart Agents.

Williams & Heintz Map is excited to announce that we are now an FAA Approved Print Provider of VFR and EnRoute Charts. We are looking forward to working with all of FAA’s current Chart Agents.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Aeronautical Information Services (AJV-5), is transitioning to an Available on Demand (AOD) model for all aeronautical charts and related products. In other words, the printing and distribution of all paper products will be met from FAA Approved Print Providers in the near future.

More information about Williams & Heintz Map Corp. becoming the first  FAA Approved Print Provider will be coming soon.

Williams & Heintz Map Sweeps Map Printing Awards

Holly and Mark Budd at the PGAMA Excellence in Print 2016 award winner Best in Category: Digital Map, a POD Chart printed for NOAA.

Holly and Mark Budd at the PGAMA Excellence in Print 2016 award winner Best in Category: Digital Map, a POD Chart printed for NOAA.

Williams & Heintz Map attended the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic (PGAMA) 2016 Excellence in Print Awards March 10th. Our maps won Best of Category  in the Digital Map  and Process Map.

Our printing of a NOAA POD Chart won Best in Category for Digital Maps. Williams & Heintz Map is a Certified NOAA POD Chart Printer.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  has authorized Williams & Heintz Map Corporation to sell NOAA’s paper nautical charts that are printed when the customer orders them, or “on demand.” The information on the charts is still maintained by NOAA, and the charts are corrected with Notices to Mariners up to the week of purchase. The certified charts are the ones that mariners should use for navigation. They make great wall art too.

Our printing and folding of the International Travel Maps & Books (ITMB) Africa Travel Reference Map won Best in Category for Process Maps.  The map is printed in 4 color process, offset lithography. The big beautiful Africa Map is 990 mm by 1300 mm. It folds to 100 mm by 248 mm. The scale is 1:5,000,000. ITMB of Vancouver Canada, has one of the most complete and impressive offerings of maps covering the globe.

Thank you to our customers, with great projects, who choose us to print your maps so that we can win prizes!

IITMB Africa Map

ITMB Africa Map won Best in Category: Process Map at the PGAMA Excellence in Print 2016 Awards Gala.

 

 

One if by Land, Two if by Sea

The New York Times just published (February 11, 2016) an opinion piece about using the GPS: Ignore the GPS. That Ocean Is Not a Road. By Greg Milner.

Milner gives us some great examples of people who have been led astray by faithfully following their GPS directions for hundreds of miles, across countries, to wrong cities, and into oceans.

Why do people unquestioningly follow their GPS device into the ocean or off a cliff?

Their use weakens our mental maps.

Most of us use GPS as a crutch while driving through unfamiliar terrain, tuning out and letting that soothing voice do the dirty work of navigating. Since the explosive rise of in-car navigation systems around 10 years ago, several studies have demonstrated empirically what we already know instinctively. Cornell researchers who analyzed the behavior of drivers using GPS found drivers “detached” from the “environments that surround them.” Their conclusion: “GPS eliminated much of the need to pay attention.”

The GPS is a great tool. So is a printed map. They complement each other. I like to use both.

I am not alone in that view. Over on the Practical Sailor Facebook page, they published an article from the Coast Guard News, announcing the approval of the official electronic chart.

“The Coast Guard will allow mariners to use official electronic charts instead of paper charts, if they choose to do so. With real-time voyage planning and monitoring information at their fingertips, mariners will no longer have the burden of maintaining a full portfolio of paper charts,” said Capt. Scott J. Smith, the chief of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Office of Navigation Systems. This technology will also allow mariners to take advantage of information and data to enhance situational awareness during voyage planning and while underway.

They ask, “What’s your opinion on digital vs. paper charts?” The comments  say it all! The sailors want printed paper charts to use with their electronic navigation systems.

So,

One if by Land:  Be sure you take a look at your map and check put the big picture before you jump in the car, program your GPS, and tune out.

and

Two if by Sea:  Keep an updated paper chart for backup!

As always, Williams & Heintz would be pleased to give you a quote on your map printing project or print a NOAA POD Chart for you.

Season’s Greetings from Williams & Heintz

Season’s Greetings from all of us at Williams & Heintz Map Corp.

Enjoy the video of the Hospice Tree that we decorated for Calvert Hospice Festival of Trees. We made the paper boats, mermaids, fish, and snowflakes from our out of date Maryland and Virginia Cruising Guides.

The 2016-2017 Williams & Heintz Maryland and Virginia Cruising Guides can be ordered now for Christmas deliveries  of the chart books. So recycle and reuse your old charts, time to ring in the new.

Soundtrack: Fish Bowl by Scott Holmes

Paper boats, mermaids, fish, and snowflakes on the Williams & Heintz Corp tree for Calvert Hospice Festival of Trees

Capitol Heights Printer Has Future Mapped Out

So much stays the same and so much changes! This article by Eric Fisher, was originally published in the Washington Times/Business Times February 10, 1997

We still print and fold maps for a wide variety of government agencies, publishers, and entrepreneurs. However how we make the maps has certainly changed since 1997!

Prepress is mostly digital now. Although as much as 10% of our work is still film based. We can still edit, proof, and print from film. The man-hours involved, to edit and update a film job, can be much less than the thousands of man-hours required to digitize a whole new map. We can even combine digital correction copy with film based layers.

 

Richard Heintz, grandson of the firm's founder, son-in-law Mark Budd examine a fresh map of the world.

Richard Heintz, grandson of the firm’s founder, son-in-law Mark Budd examine a fresh map of the world.

Made in Washington

Producer: Williams & Heintz

What It Makes: This 76 year-old Capitol Heights company prints a variety of maps, from detailed, government-issued nautical and geologic maps to folded road maps for companies such as Michelin and Alexandria’s ADC. Williams & Heintz specializes in maps up to 47 inches by 63 inches in size.

How it makes them: The process to print a map is somewhat similar to  that of printing a newspaper, though more care is taken to ensure color quality. After the map has been drafted, a photograph is made of it. The negative is used to make an aluminum plate for the printing press. Chemicals on the plate help color to be distributed on the press as desired.

How much it makes: company executives could not give a specific number of maps produced, but with more than 900 clients typically making large orders, output is easily in tens of millions. Williams & Heintz generated more than $6 million in revenue in 1996, said Mark Budd, the company’s treasurer and secretary.

Where to find them: Clients include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and several state topographical and geological-survey agencies. Williams & Heintz maps can also be found along Virginia highways; tje company won a one-year contract to print 3.75 million copies of the 1996-97 map passed out at rest stops. The 37-employee company also recently won the road map contracts with New York and North Carolina.

The niche: The company began with four former employees of the U. S. Geologic Survey in 1921. After many years at Third and I street NE, Williams & Heintz moved to Capitol Heights in 1958.

One of a small number of dedicated map printers in North America, Williams & Heintz likes to distinguish itself with “intelligent folding” maps. Until about 15 years ago, most road maps were given out or sold at nominal cost. As a result, they were cheaply made, and user-friendly attributes were not a priority, Mr. Budd said. After customers showed a willingness to pay for quality maps, the company invested $500,000 in a self-designed folding machine to create road maps that fold up easily in an accordion style.

“Easy-folding maps have been in Europe and Asia for nearly a hundred years,” Mr. Budd said. “It’s only started in the last few years here. But it’s caught on like wildfire.”

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. Volunteer Travels to Tanzania to Share Skills with Local Farmers

I just got back from Tanzania with the Farmer to Farmer program that promotes economic growth and Agricultural development in East Africa!

Holly Heintz Budd and some of the CRS Farmer to Farmer participants in Muvwa Village, Mbeya, Tanzania

Holly Heintz Budd and some of the CRS Farmer to Farmer participants in Muvwa Village, Mbeya, Tanzania

I traveled to Tanzania for 2½ weeks to share my technical skills and expertise with local farmers. My assignment is part of Catholic Relief Services’ Farmer-to-Farmer (CRS FTF) program that promotes economic growth, food security, and agricultural development in East Africa.

In addition to being a map printer, I am a smallholder farmer. I grow food for my family and am the chair of the Maryland Organic Food and Farming Association. This experience gave me the opportunity to stretch my limits. I have always found that I learn so much from teaching others. Plus, it is awesome to share the knowledge and experience that I have gained over the years, with a project promoting social justice.

In Tanzania, I worked with Caritas Mbeya, training in organizational development, association strengthening, and giving technical assistance to smallholder farmers. The objective is to enable smallholder farmer groups in Mbalizi Parish to improve leadership and management, enhanced group dynamics and cohesion, strengthen their associations and cooperation. 121 farmers attended the trainings, which will benefit up to 3000 villagers in the area.

I taught the farmers in Mchewe, Itimba, and Muvwa Villages in Mbeya, Tanzania about contracts and contract farming. We analyzed the strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities of their groups. Strong cooperative groups will help the farmers pool their resources to balance their power with the middlemen/buyers, and obtain contracts to sell a larger amount of product. The groups will be able to support members and save product to sell when scarce and prices are higher. We discussed, target markets and marketing mix. We talked about mission, objectives, what articles to include in their bylaws to strengthen and insure transparency and fairness. I even came up with “Holly’s 9 Leadership Tips”.

 “One thing we are certain of is that this program will be beneficial not just to the farmers in East Africa, but also to the volunteers from America,” said Bruce White, CRS’ director for the program. “It’s going to make the world a little bit smaller for everyone involved.” I agree!

Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the five-year program matches the technical assistance of U.S. farmers, agribusinesses, cooperatives, and universities to help farmers in developing countries improve agricultural productivity, access new markets, and increase their incomes.

My volunteer assignment is one of nearly 500 assignments that focus on agriculture, food security and nutrition in Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda. This is the first time CRS has been involved in the 28-year-old Farmer-to-Farmer Program funded by the U.S. government. The U.S. volunteers travel to East Africa for anywhere from one to six weeks, their expenses covered by USAID.

 

 

It’s Earth Day, Hope You Do Something Green to Celebrate!

It’s Earth Day! Hope You Do Something Green to Celebrate- I am going for a walk in the forest.

  • Forests cover one third of the earth’s land and absorb massive amounts of carbon dioxide making them a major instrument in mitigating climate change.
  • They absorb airborne impurities and give off oxygen allowing us to breathe clean air.
  • Forests protect our watersheds and provide us with clean water.
  • They are home to the majority of the world’s terrestrial species, and many people around the world—1.6 billion according to the World Wildlife Fund—depend on forests for their livelihoods.

The wise use of the world’s forests is critical to our survival and a healthy environment.  Forests are vital in maintaining life as we know it.

paper and sustainable forestryWe are often led to believe that using paper is bad for the environment and that forest practices always lead to eroded lands and fewer trees—not so in North America!

As can be seen on the above Two Sides infographic:

  • Wood from well-managed forests is a sustainable resource that is renewable, recyclable and can be planted, grown, harvested and replanted.
  • Most paper is made using wood by-products (chips) from the lumber industry and recycled paper rather than whole trees which are typically used for lumber production.
  • Forests in the U.S and Canada grow significantly more wood than is harvested each year.

After my I walk in the forest, I am going to plant my American Plum tree that I got at a community Earth Day celebration last weekend. I hope you do something green to celebrate Earth Day too!

What is a Map? Maps Provide the Big Picture

What is a map?

A map is a way to present information on music, history, science, and the arts in new ways.  A map is a tool that helps you make connections between different places; to connect the dots.

What is a map?

A map is Like the International Map Industry Association: IMIA is all about the business of maps.  IMIA helps you make connections between different people in the map business.

What is a map?

A map is about how to make a living; a creative endeavor to put food on the table for us and our employees.  Printing maps was my Daddy’s and Granddaddy’s business. It is mine still.

What is a map?

A map is something that my Daddy and Granddaddy made at work. Every morning they went away.  Every evening they came home. Sometimes, with a great big printed paper map. It is to put on the wall, a gift for friends and neighbors. A map can be an artistic expression and a marketing tool.

Some may say that the printed map is done for, but it is a mistake to see it as a print vs. digital media competition. The greatest result is achieved when the two are used together. The printed map provides the “big picture” and the resulting spatial awareness shows you where to crunch down for detail using the mobile device. Without the digital, you lose the enormous resources of the internet. Without the printed map you don’t know what to do with the mobile device. Electronic devices are not replacing printed products, but they complement each other, and make each more effective.

This post was originally published on the IMIA Blog

We love Maps: 2015-2016 is International Map Year

We love maps International Map Year (IMY) 2015-2016

At Williams & Heintz Map, we are excited about the opportunities that International Map Year (IMY) 2015-2016 provides to demonstrate, follow, and get involved in the art, science and technology of making and using maps and geographic information.

International Map Year is a worldwide celebration of maps and their unique role in our world.  It provides opportunities to demonstrate, follow, and get involved in the art, science and technology of making and using maps and geographic information. Supported by the United Nations, IMY is an intensive international, interdisciplinary, scientific, and social strategy to focus on the importance of maps and geographic information in the world today. The most important legacies will be a new generation of cartographers and geographic information scientists, as well as an exceptional level of interest and participation from professionals, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide.

International Map Year is organized by the International Cartographic Association (ICA), and endorsed by the International Map Industry Association. IMIA will promote the International Map Year as part of the IMIA Americas Region Conference ‘International Map Year’, September 27–29, 2015, Washington, D.C. USA.

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