Monthly Archives: June 2012

Save the trees, don’t print? No, paper is a sustainable way to communicate

Print Grows Trees

Save the trees, don’t print.  I hate seeing this message at the bottom of documents on my computer.  It is an easy thing for marketers to say, to make them, and you, feel good about saving time and money with electronic communication.  This falsehood carries over in to all forms of print, not just those emails, making everyone believe that paper is bad. Printing is bad.  But is it really?  Would you say, “Save the tomatoes, don’t eat pizza”?  It is a fallacy that electronic media is more environmentally friendly than print.

Paper is a sustainable way to communicate.  Print Grows Trees provides some facts about the environmental benefits of printed paper:

Printed paper is made from a renewable resource. Trees can be replanted in places where they were harvested and also in places where they don’t currently grow. As much as we love our electronic devices, they don’t grow on trees or anywhere else.

54.7 percent of all paper in the U.S. is currently recycled.

Printed paper can be recycled, recovered and reused. The systems that are in place for these processes are widely available and have become more efficient and sophisticated over the many years they have existed. In contrast, electronic devices are much more complex and expensive to recycle, recover and reuse due to the toxic nature of many of their components, and current systems are still in the early stages.

The average data center serving our electronic devices consumes the same amount of energy as 25,000 households.

The paper we use to print in the U.S. is made from more than 60 percent biofuels. Paper mills use what’s left over from the manufacturing process to generate bioenergy on site. This serves to:

  • Divert waste from landfills
  • Decrease the overall carbon footprint of paper products
  • Decrease dependency on coal and other fossil fuels
  • Help meet green energy goals in America

By contrast, server farms that power computers have become the fastest growing users of fossil fuel in the world, and the amount of energy they use is doubling every year.

I, along with printers all around the world, was very surprised to find that Toshiba America Business Solutions has announced that Oct. 23, 2012, will be “National No-Print Day.” Toshiba wants to “raise awareness of the impact printing has on our planet” and of “the role of paper in the workplace.   The European organization, Two Sides,  has challenged Toshiba’s ‘No Print Day’ as Greenwash .

Printing Industries of America’s President and CEO Michael Makin had this to say:

“Printing is the only medium with a one-time carbon footprint—all other media require energy every time they are viewed. Electronic devices, which Toshiba produces, for example, require the mining and refining of dozens of minerals and metals, as well as the use of plastics, hydrocarbon solvents, and other non-renewable resources. Moreover 50–80 percent of electronic waste collected for recycling is shipped overseas and is often unsafely dismantled. For Toshiba to call for such a ban on printing is hypocritical to say the least.”

I have a previous Blog post about my experience with printed maps versus electronics.  Surprise:  Print and electronics work together to provide more value.  Why would Toshiba, who makes printers, and fax machines completely loose sight of this?

UPDATE:  Toshiba has agreed to abort its National No-Print Day!

Ohio Scenic Rivers Map, Best of Category Award of Excellence at the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic (PGAMA) 2012 Excellence in Print Award

Map of Little Miami River in Ohio printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process

Williams & Heintz Map attended the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic (PGAMA) 2012 Excellence in Print Awards Gala on March 23rd. Our maps were finalists in the map category, winning Awards of Excellence.

Our printing and folding of the Ohio Scenic Rivers Map, for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process!

The print quality of everything entered was excellent, so it must have been the tricky map folding that won the award.  The 55 inch x 8 ½ inch piece is 15 panels that first accordion fold. Then, the last two folds wrap around, resulting in a short fold on the cover.   We had to feed it tail first.   The final size is 8 ½ inches x 3 ¾ inches.

Here is a link to my previous post with map folding and finishing tips.

This map was featured in a  post about QR Codes.

The Little Miami River is designated as an Ohio State and National Scenic River.  It has breathtaking vistas and scenery and a rich history. The Little Miami River and its watershed support an abundant variety of plants and animals.

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River 55 x 8 ½ printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River Map Accordian folds then last 2 folds wrap

Ohio DNR Little Miami River Map printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp

Little Miami River Map Help Protect Ohio's Scenic Rivers

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River folds to 8 ½ x 3 ¾

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