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The Map Experience

What if you had never seen a printed map? What if all you only knew about was electronic devices? This tongue in cheek video is an introduction to “a new bio-optical knowledge recording and dissemination system, responding to the trade name: Map.”

Created by The Regional Centre for Geographic Information Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur (CRIGE  PACA).   It was shown during  meeting, a conference called SIG La Lettre.

Watch the video which helps you to understand “the use of maps.” It is full of great information about map features like:

“Here’s how it works:  Map  consists of a large window,  integrated in a flexible cellulose pad, and compressed hundreds of times, thanks to the FUF technology:  folding/unfolding.

“Map” is able of storing millions of information bits, which are then optically scanned, and thus directly transmitted to the brain.

Thanks to a particularly ergonomic navigation interface, based on an intuitive forearm supination and pronation mechanism, pans, zooms and rotations are performed without image degradation, smoothly, with a refresh rate of a few picoseconds.

It has a 100% toutchpad allowing simultaneous use of 10 fingers.

Color stability is perfect, whatever the light conditions.”

In Today’s world of security worries, the Map video playfully reminds us, without a direct comparison to our digital devices, that that people are not likely to steal your map on the subway and:

“Map” respects users’ privacy:  impossible to hack, and without any antivirus or firewall, annotations are locally stored and never sent to any server.

And “Map” is unbreakable!

Finally, the video reminds us that a print map is great for decorating, and is a recyclable, sustainable,  product.

Happy watching!  (Link here)
Map is an unprecedented technological revolution:  Without cables, without electronics, without connection, compact, convertible and portable. “Map” can be used everywhere: at home, at the office, in the car, by bicycle, horseback riding, even in extreme cold! “Map” is available at any time… without battery, nor socket. “Map” does not crash ever. “Map” does not need to be reset nor updated. “Map” can also prevent an unwanted encounter.

‘Map is an unprecedented technological revolution: Without cables, without electronics, without connection, compact, convertible and portable.
“Map” can be used everywhere: at home, at the office, in the car, by bicycle, horseback riding, even in extreme cold!
“Map” is available at any time… without battery, nor socket.
“Map” does not crash ever.
“Map” does not need to be reset nor updated.
“Map” can also prevent an unwanted encounter.’

Save the trees, don’t print? No, paper is a sustainable way to communicate

Print Grows Trees

Save the trees, don’t print.  I hate seeing this message at the bottom of documents on my computer.  It is an easy thing for marketers to say, to make them, and you, feel good about saving time and money with electronic communication.  This falsehood carries over in to all forms of print, not just those emails, making everyone believe that paper is bad. Printing is bad.  But is it really?  Would you say, “Save the tomatoes, don’t eat pizza”?  It is a fallacy that electronic media is more environmentally friendly than print.

Paper is a sustainable way to communicate.  Print Grows Trees provides some facts about the environmental benefits of printed paper:

Printed paper is made from a renewable resource. Trees can be replanted in places where they were harvested and also in places where they don’t currently grow. As much as we love our electronic devices, they don’t grow on trees or anywhere else.

54.7 percent of all paper in the U.S. is currently recycled.

Printed paper can be recycled, recovered and reused. The systems that are in place for these processes are widely available and have become more efficient and sophisticated over the many years they have existed. In contrast, electronic devices are much more complex and expensive to recycle, recover and reuse due to the toxic nature of many of their components, and current systems are still in the early stages.

The average data center serving our electronic devices consumes the same amount of energy as 25,000 households.

The paper we use to print in the U.S. is made from more than 60 percent biofuels. Paper mills use what’s left over from the manufacturing process to generate bioenergy on site. This serves to:

  • Divert waste from landfills
  • Decrease the overall carbon footprint of paper products
  • Decrease dependency on coal and other fossil fuels
  • Help meet green energy goals in America

By contrast, server farms that power computers have become the fastest growing users of fossil fuel in the world, and the amount of energy they use is doubling every year.

I, along with printers all around the world, was very surprised to find that Toshiba America Business Solutions has announced that Oct. 23, 2012, will be “National No-Print Day.” Toshiba wants to “raise awareness of the impact printing has on our planet” and of “the role of paper in the workplace.   The European organization, Two Sides,  has challenged Toshiba’s ‘No Print Day’ as Greenwash .

Printing Industries of America’s President and CEO Michael Makin had this to say:

“Printing is the only medium with a one-time carbon footprint—all other media require energy every time they are viewed. Electronic devices, which Toshiba produces, for example, require the mining and refining of dozens of minerals and metals, as well as the use of plastics, hydrocarbon solvents, and other non-renewable resources. Moreover 50–80 percent of electronic waste collected for recycling is shipped overseas and is often unsafely dismantled. For Toshiba to call for such a ban on printing is hypocritical to say the least.”

I have a previous Blog post about my experience with printed maps versus electronics.  Surprise:  Print and electronics work together to provide more value.  Why would Toshiba, who makes printers, and fax machines completely loose sight of this?

UPDATE:  Toshiba has agreed to abort its National No-Print Day!

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