Blog Archives

One if by Land, Two if by Sea

The New York Times just published (February 11, 2016) an opinion piece about using the GPS: Ignore the GPS. That Ocean Is Not a Road. By Greg Milner.

Milner gives us some great examples of people who have been led astray by faithfully following their GPS directions for hundreds of miles, across countries, to wrong cities, and into oceans.

Why do people unquestioningly follow their GPS device into the ocean or off a cliff?

Their use weakens our mental maps.

Most of us use GPS as a crutch while driving through unfamiliar terrain, tuning out and letting that soothing voice do the dirty work of navigating. Since the explosive rise of in-car navigation systems around 10 years ago, several studies have demonstrated empirically what we already know instinctively. Cornell researchers who analyzed the behavior of drivers using GPS found drivers “detached” from the “environments that surround them.” Their conclusion: “GPS eliminated much of the need to pay attention.”

The GPS is a great tool. So is a printed map. They complement each other. I like to use both.

I am not alone in that view. Over on the Practical Sailor Facebook page, they published an article from the Coast Guard News, announcing the approval of the official electronic chart.

“The Coast Guard will allow mariners to use official electronic charts instead of paper charts, if they choose to do so. With real-time voyage planning and monitoring information at their fingertips, mariners will no longer have the burden of maintaining a full portfolio of paper charts,” said Capt. Scott J. Smith, the chief of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Office of Navigation Systems. This technology will also allow mariners to take advantage of information and data to enhance situational awareness during voyage planning and while underway.

They ask, “What’s your opinion on digital vs. paper charts?” The comments  say it all! The sailors want printed paper charts to use with their electronic navigation systems.

So,

One if by Land:  Be sure you take a look at your map and check put the big picture before you jump in the car, program your GPS, and tune out.

and

Two if by Sea:  Keep an updated paper chart for backup!

As always, Williams & Heintz would be pleased to give you a quote on your map printing project or print a NOAA POD Chart for you.

Season’s Greetings from Williams & Heintz

Season’s Greetings from all of us at Williams & Heintz Map Corp.

Enjoy the video of the Hospice Tree that we decorated for Calvert Hospice Festival of Trees. We made the paper boats, mermaids, fish, and snowflakes from our out of date Maryland and Virginia Cruising Guides.

The 2016-2017 Williams & Heintz Maryland and Virginia Cruising Guides can be ordered now for Christmas deliveries  of the chart books. So recycle and reuse your old charts, time to ring in the new.

Soundtrack: Fish Bowl by Scott Holmes

Paper boats, mermaids, fish, and snowflakes on the Williams & Heintz Corp tree for Calvert Hospice Festival of Trees

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. Volunteer Travels to Tanzania to Share Skills with Local Farmers

I just got back from Tanzania with the Farmer to Farmer program that promotes economic growth and Agricultural development in East Africa!

Holly Heintz Budd and some of the CRS Farmer to Farmer participants in Muvwa Village, Mbeya, Tanzania

Holly Heintz Budd and some of the CRS Farmer to Farmer participants in Muvwa Village, Mbeya, Tanzania

I traveled to Tanzania for 2½ weeks to share my technical skills and expertise with local farmers. My assignment is part of Catholic Relief Services’ Farmer-to-Farmer (CRS FTF) program that promotes economic growth, food security, and agricultural development in East Africa.

In addition to being a map printer, I am a smallholder farmer. I grow food for my family and am the chair of the Maryland Organic Food and Farming Association. This experience gave me the opportunity to stretch my limits. I have always found that I learn so much from teaching others. Plus, it is awesome to share the knowledge and experience that I have gained over the years, with a project promoting social justice.

In Tanzania, I worked with Caritas Mbeya, training in organizational development, association strengthening, and giving technical assistance to smallholder farmers. The objective is to enable smallholder farmer groups in Mbalizi Parish to improve leadership and management, enhanced group dynamics and cohesion, strengthen their associations and cooperation. 121 farmers attended the trainings, which will benefit up to 3000 villagers in the area.

I taught the farmers in Mchewe, Itimba, and Muvwa Villages in Mbeya, Tanzania about contracts and contract farming. We analyzed the strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities of their groups. Strong cooperative groups will help the farmers pool their resources to balance their power with the middlemen/buyers, and obtain contracts to sell a larger amount of product. The groups will be able to support members and save product to sell when scarce and prices are higher. We discussed, target markets and marketing mix. We talked about mission, objectives, what articles to include in their bylaws to strengthen and insure transparency and fairness. I even came up with “Holly’s 9 Leadership Tips”.

 “One thing we are certain of is that this program will be beneficial not just to the farmers in East Africa, but also to the volunteers from America,” said Bruce White, CRS’ director for the program. “It’s going to make the world a little bit smaller for everyone involved.” I agree!

Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the five-year program matches the technical assistance of U.S. farmers, agribusinesses, cooperatives, and universities to help farmers in developing countries improve agricultural productivity, access new markets, and increase their incomes.

My volunteer assignment is one of nearly 500 assignments that focus on agriculture, food security and nutrition in Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda. This is the first time CRS has been involved in the 28-year-old Farmer-to-Farmer Program funded by the U.S. government. The U.S. volunteers travel to East Africa for anywhere from one to six weeks, their expenses covered by USAID.

 

 

We love Maps: 2015-2016 is International Map Year

We love maps International Map Year (IMY) 2015-2016

At Williams & Heintz Map, we are excited about the opportunities that International Map Year (IMY) 2015-2016 provides to demonstrate, follow, and get involved in the art, science and technology of making and using maps and geographic information.

International Map Year is a worldwide celebration of maps and their unique role in our world.  It provides opportunities to demonstrate, follow, and get involved in the art, science and technology of making and using maps and geographic information. Supported by the United Nations, IMY is an intensive international, interdisciplinary, scientific, and social strategy to focus on the importance of maps and geographic information in the world today. The most important legacies will be a new generation of cartographers and geographic information scientists, as well as an exceptional level of interest and participation from professionals, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide.

International Map Year is organized by the International Cartographic Association (ICA), and endorsed by the International Map Industry Association. IMIA will promote the International Map Year as part of the IMIA Americas Region Conference ‘International Map Year’, September 27–29, 2015, Washington, D.C. USA.

Soil Maps

2015 is the United Nations International Year of Soils

The 68th UN General Assembly declared 2015 the International Year of Soils (IYS 2015).  In honor of this, here are two soil maps from the Williams & Heintz Map Vault.

Soil map of Talbot County, MD 1929

Soil map of Talbot County, MD. Printed by Williams & Heintz  Co. in 1929.

SOIL MAP From: SOIL LANDSCAPES AND GEOMORPHIC REGIONS-BEMIDJI SHEET Publisher: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE

Section of a SOIL MAP Printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. in the 1980s.
From: SOIL LANDSCAPES AND GEOMORPHIC REGIONS-BEMIDJI SHEET
Publisher: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE

Why International Year of Soils?

Soils are a finite natural resource and are nonrenewable on a human time scale.  Soils are the foundation for food, animal feed, fuel and natural fiber production, the supply of clean water, nutrient cycling and a range of ecosystem functions.  The area of fertile soils covering the world’s surface is limited and increasingly subject to degradation, poor management and loss to urbanization.  Increased awareness of the life-supporting functions of soil is called for if this trend is to be reversed and so enable the levels of food production necessary to meet the demands of population levels predicted for 2050.  Soil Science Society of America

You can find interactive, digital soil maps on line at GlobalSoilMap.net and at the USDA’s Web Soil Survey.

The FAO/UNESCO Soil Map of the World  has published soil maps of continents and large regions at 1:5 000 000 scale. They would look great as print maps! 😉

 

 

 

 

Here Be Cats

Cat on the Map

My cat, Sneazer Agustus, is enjoying perusing the 2006 Antique Style World Map. The map was published by American Map Corporation, printed by Williams & Heintz on 80 lb. Aged Parchtone.

In early cartography, map makers used mythical beasts and said, “Here be Dragons,” when they came to a part of the world that was a mystery. They filled the page with fantastic beasts. Maybe even cats? Here be Cats!

Sneazer Agustus Cat on the map

Another reason why map makers may leave information off maps is because they  do not wish to make a political statement with their cartography. They may go out of their way to make the map so that the name or boundary is not included, or is not legible, to stay out of the conflict. “What’s in a name? that which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet.”

Cat on the Antique Style World Map

This beautiful map, on parchment like paper, is out of print but a quick google search of “2006 antique style world map” will take you to several sources to purchase. Go ahead, we’ll print more! 😉

Here be Cats!

Here be Cats!

Oh, You’re a Map Printer, I’m So Sorry!

“Oh, you’re a map printer, I’m so sorry!”

That’s the kind of response I frequently hear when I tell people what I do.  They see all the GPS and cell phone map apps and think only of road maps that they don’t know how to read.

Well there are a lot of other kinds of maps out there to print, besides road maps. Here are a few, click on the tiles below to see the larger image and a little bit about them.

Williams & Heintz prints many different kinds of maps and charts

Williams & Heintz prints many different kinds of maps and charts

Here’s another thing, all those different kinds of maps were printed over 30 years ago, made by hand, with cameras and film. I scanned them off an old Williams & Heintz marketing piece; so old it doesn’t even have anything about a web site or email contact.

Just think what we can do now with computers, the internet, available data, and digital mapping tools!  (more about that in a later post)

All these new tools make cartography and map making more available, to many more people, to publish more maps.

And some of these great maps  even make it to print on paper.

When you want to see the big picture, nothing beats a big map on a big piece of paper.

It’s a great time to be a map printer!

More about map printing paper specifications

Determining the size of your map

Choosing Ink Colors

Communicating with your printer for best map design

Map finishing and folding

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation Receives MDOT Minority Business Enterprise Certification as a Woman Owned Business

Press Release

Capitol Heights, MD, July 8, 2013:  Williams & Heintz Map Corporation, a specialist in map printing, production, and folding, is pleased to announce that it has received certification as a Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) from The Maryland Department of Transportation’s (MDOT) Office of Minority Business Enterprise (OMBE).

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation has been printing maps for entrepreneurs, government agencies, and map publishers since 1921. They combine the highest quality pre-press, printing, folding with industry leading knowledge and customer service.

“We are excited to be officially certified as a Minority Business Enterprise for Commercial Printing and Support Activities for Printing. We look forward to the opportunities that certification will bring,” said Holly Heintz Budd, President and CEO of Williams & Heintz Map Corporation.

MDOT’s OMBE is Maryland’s Official Certification agency. They have one of the most stringent certification processes in the U.S. To be eligible for certification as an MBE firm, a business must be at least 51% owned and controlled by one or more socially-and economically-disadvantaged individuals, including women. MDOT has a comprehensive certification process to determine the ownership and control of firms. Only certified firms are eligible to fulfill minority participation goals on contracts issued by the state of Maryland.

For additional information about Williams & Heintz Map Corporation, please visit www.whmap.com

For additional information about The Maryland Department of Transportation’s (MDOT) Office of Minority Business Enterprise (OMBE), visit http://www.mdot.maryland.gov

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation

A Peek Inside Williams & Heintz Map Corporation

We have a new video for our map printing company, Williams & Heintz Map Corporation. Hope you enjoy the quick look at the people who expertly print your maps.

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation is a map printer. We have been printing maps for entrepreneurs, government agencies, and map publishers since 1921. We combine the highest quality map pre-press, map printing, and map folding with  industry leading knowledge, and customer service.

There is a special craft to printing and folding maps, different from any other sheet fed work. Maps have unique challenges when it comes to color balance and registration.  At Williams & Heintz, our craftsmen have the most experience in the business of printing maps and they know how to meet these challenges.

Experienced cartographic technicians prepare your maps for printing with an assortment of graphic and GIS software,  integrating data with accompanying text, graphics, photographs, logos, street indexes and tables into a clean, publication-quality layout.

Skilled pressmen print maps as large as 47 ¼ ” x 63”, on a wide selection of paper stocks, including high wet strength and plastic. Our presses that print up to 6 colors in one pass. We are specialists at printing oversize sheets.

The in-house bindery team folds maps in many configurations, including user-friendly styles that can be leafed through like the pages of a book. We can fold anything we can print. We can make 16 parallel accordion folds, up to 44 inched wide, on what may be the largest map folder in the world, uniquely configured for us!

Knowledgeable consultants help you design and produce your map, using ecologically sustainable materials and methods. We welcome your difficult reproduction problems and complex technical maps as well as simpler jobs. All will get the same care and attention to detail that maps require.

Experience, quality, and great customer service with over 92 years of in the business can be found here at Williams and Heintz Map Corporation…

From the Map Vault: Atlanta Tax Maps 1930

Atlanta 1930 Map Corner with Williams & Heintz Co.

Atlanta 1930 Map Corner with Williams & Heintz Co.

Over on our facebook page, Williams & Heintz has a new “like”, and it came with the most Awesome link!  Jack Kittle, of  Decatur, Georgia, found 1927-1930 topographic maps of Atlanta.  Our name is listed in the lower right hand corner.  Here is the link, that will take you to the Digital Gallery at Emory University. They have 75 pages of the City of Atlanta tax plat maps that we printed when my great grandfather first got into the map printing business.

Company lore has it that, one of our original jobs as a map company was engraving, (copper plate), and printing, (stone lithography), tax plats for cities, of which Atlanta was one. Without accurate maps, the cities were losing revenue, because they didn’t know who to send the bill to.

Jack Says, “I first ran into copies of these maps at the DeKalb History Center. Their copies are from the DeKalb County Planning Department. New developments – streets and buildings – were carefully added in black ink until sometime in the 1950s. This fits the tax plat scenario. Note that this usage was not in the City of Atlanta, rather in the area to the east.”

Read more:

A Quick Look at Williams & Heintz Map Corp. in Map Printing History.

What Role Have Women Played in the History of Mapmaking?

MARBL Historic Map Collection: City of Atlanta: Sheet 7 Printed by Williams & Heintz Co. in 1930.

Collection: MARBL Historic Map Collection
Identifier: 07_300dpi
Title: City of Atlanta: Sheet 7
Creator: U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey
Publisher: U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey and City of Atlanta Mapping Division
Date: 1930
Description: Color map showing Associated Reform Presbyterian Church, Druid Hills Baptist Church, Druid Hills Presbyterian Church and Springdale Park.
Scale: 2400
Projection: Polyconic
Dimensions: 47 x 39 cm.
Format: image/jpeg
Type: Atlas Map
Country: United States
State or Province: Georgia
County: Fulton County; Dekalb County
City: Atlanta
Full Title: City of Atlanta: Sheet 7. Construction Department, William A. Hansell, Chief; S.P. Floore, Topographic Engineeer in charge. Topography by W.H. Manley. Control by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey and City of Atlanta Mapping Division. Surveyed in 1928. Williams & Heintz Co., Wash, D.C.
Publication Title: Atlas of Atlanta and Vicinity, 1928
Publication Type: City Atlas
Publication Date: 1930
Institution: Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.
Rights: The City of Atlanta has granted Emory University, Woodruff Library, permission to digitize, distribute, display and geo-reference maps produced by the U.S. Coast Guard and Geodetic Survey and the City of Altanta Mapping Division in a 1928 survey published as the Atlas of Atlanta and VIcinity. Emory may digitize, display, and georeference the maps in electronic formats, including free public access to maps on the web. The City of Atlanta does not attest to the accuracy of the image. The Maps Content, including all images and text, are for personal, educational, and non-commercial use only.

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