Monthly Archives: March 2015

What is a Map? Maps Provide the Big Picture

What is a map?

A map is a way to present information on music, history, science, and the arts in new ways.  A map is a tool that helps you make connections between different places; to connect the dots.

What is a map?

A map is Like the International Map Industry Association: IMIA is all about the business of maps.  IMIA helps you make connections between different people in the map business.

What is a map?

A map is about how to make a living; a creative endeavor to put food on the table for us and our employees.  Printing maps was my Daddy’s and Granddaddy’s business. It is mine still.

What is a map?

A map is something that my Daddy and Granddaddy made at work. Every morning they went away.  Every evening they came home. Sometimes, with a great big printed paper map. It is to put on the wall, a gift for friends and neighbors. A map can be an artistic expression and a marketing tool.

Some may say that the printed map is done for, but it is a mistake to see it as a print vs. digital media competition. The greatest result is achieved when the two are used together. The printed map provides the “big picture” and the resulting spatial awareness shows you where to crunch down for detail using the mobile device. Without the digital, you lose the enormous resources of the internet. Without the printed map you don’t know what to do with the mobile device. Electronic devices are not replacing printed products, but they complement each other, and make each more effective.

This post was originally published on the IMIA Blog

We love Maps: 2015-2016 is International Map Year

We love maps International Map Year (IMY) 2015-2016

At Williams & Heintz Map, we are excited about the opportunities that International Map Year (IMY) 2015-2016 provides to demonstrate, follow, and get involved in the art, science and technology of making and using maps and geographic information.

International Map Year is a worldwide celebration of maps and their unique role in our world.  It provides opportunities to demonstrate, follow, and get involved in the art, science and technology of making and using maps and geographic information. Supported by the United Nations, IMY is an intensive international, interdisciplinary, scientific, and social strategy to focus on the importance of maps and geographic information in the world today. The most important legacies will be a new generation of cartographers and geographic information scientists, as well as an exceptional level of interest and participation from professionals, schoolchildren, the general public, and decision-makers, worldwide.

International Map Year is organized by the International Cartographic Association (ICA), and endorsed by the International Map Industry Association. IMIA will promote the International Map Year as part of the IMIA Americas Region Conference ‘International Map Year’, September 27–29, 2015, Washington, D.C. USA.

Soil Maps

2015 is the United Nations International Year of Soils

The 68th UN General Assembly declared 2015 the International Year of Soils (IYS 2015).  In honor of this, here are two soil maps from the Williams & Heintz Map Vault.

Soil map of Talbot County, MD 1929

Soil map of Talbot County, MD. Printed by Williams & Heintz  Co. in 1929.

SOIL MAP From: SOIL LANDSCAPES AND GEOMORPHIC REGIONS-BEMIDJI SHEET Publisher: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE

Section of a SOIL MAP Printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. in the 1980s.
From: SOIL LANDSCAPES AND GEOMORPHIC REGIONS-BEMIDJI SHEET
Publisher: UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE

Why International Year of Soils?

Soils are a finite natural resource and are nonrenewable on a human time scale.  Soils are the foundation for food, animal feed, fuel and natural fiber production, the supply of clean water, nutrient cycling and a range of ecosystem functions.  The area of fertile soils covering the world’s surface is limited and increasingly subject to degradation, poor management and loss to urbanization.  Increased awareness of the life-supporting functions of soil is called for if this trend is to be reversed and so enable the levels of food production necessary to meet the demands of population levels predicted for 2050.  Soil Science Society of America

You can find interactive, digital soil maps on line at GlobalSoilMap.net and at the USDA’s Web Soil Survey.

The FAO/UNESCO Soil Map of the World  has published soil maps of continents and large regions at 1:5 000 000 scale. They would look great as print maps! 😉

 

 

 

 

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