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Williams & Heintz Map Helps You Print Smart for International Print Day16

Use #PrintSmart on social media to learn about all the great things that you can do with print in International Print Day, October, 19, 2016

Use #PrintSmart and #IPD16 on social media to learn about all the great things that you can do with print on International Print Day, October, 19, 2016

Happy International Print Day!

This year the International Print Day theme is Print Smart. #PrintSmart is all about sharing education and resources for learning about how wonderfully relevant print is in the digital age.

At Williams & Heintz Map Corporation, we would like to share some Map Printing Tips. Our map printing tips were originally published as a series of posts when we first started our blog. We answer frequently asked questions about Map Pre-Press, Map Printing, and Map Folding.

Map Printing FAQ

How do I choose the paper for my map?

How do I  decide on the size of my map?

How do I choose ink colors for my map?

What do I need to consider about Map folding and finishing?

Is it important to ask questions and communicate with my printer?

 

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Williams & Heintz Map Sweeps Map Printing Awards

Holly and Mark Budd at the PGAMA Excellence in Print 2016 award winner Best in Category: Digital Map, a POD Chart printed for NOAA.

Holly and Mark Budd at the PGAMA Excellence in Print 2016 award winner Best in Category: Digital Map, a POD Chart printed for NOAA.

Williams & Heintz Map attended the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic (PGAMA) 2016 Excellence in Print Awards March 10th. Our maps won Best of Category  in the Digital Map  and Process Map.

Our printing of a NOAA POD Chart won Best in Category for Digital Maps. Williams & Heintz Map is a Certified NOAA POD Chart Printer.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  has authorized Williams & Heintz Map Corporation to sell NOAA’s paper nautical charts that are printed when the customer orders them, or “on demand.” The information on the charts is still maintained by NOAA, and the charts are corrected with Notices to Mariners up to the week of purchase. The certified charts are the ones that mariners should use for navigation. They make great wall art too.

Our printing and folding of the International Travel Maps & Books (ITMB) Africa Travel Reference Map won Best in Category for Process Maps.  The map is printed in 4 color process, offset lithography. The big beautiful Africa Map is 990 mm by 1300 mm. It folds to 100 mm by 248 mm. The scale is 1:5,000,000. ITMB of Vancouver Canada, has one of the most complete and impressive offerings of maps covering the globe.

Thank you to our customers, with great projects, who choose us to print your maps so that we can win prizes!

IITMB Africa Map

ITMB Africa Map won Best in Category: Process Map at the PGAMA Excellence in Print 2016 Awards Gala.

 

 

Capitol Heights Printer Has Future Mapped Out

So much stays the same and so much changes! This article by Eric Fisher, was originally published in the Washington Times/Business Times February 10, 1997

We still print and fold maps for a wide variety of government agencies, publishers, and entrepreneurs. However how we make the maps has certainly changed since 1997!

Prepress is mostly digital now. Although as much as 10% of our work is still film based. We can still edit, proof, and print from film. The man-hours involved, to edit and update a film job, can be much less than the thousands of man-hours required to digitize a whole new map. We can even combine digital correction copy with film based layers.

 

Richard Heintz, grandson of the firm's founder, son-in-law Mark Budd examine a fresh map of the world.

Richard Heintz, grandson of the firm’s founder, son-in-law Mark Budd examine a fresh map of the world.

Made in Washington

Producer: Williams & Heintz

What It Makes: This 76 year-old Capitol Heights company prints a variety of maps, from detailed, government-issued nautical and geologic maps to folded road maps for companies such as Michelin and Alexandria’s ADC. Williams & Heintz specializes in maps up to 47 inches by 63 inches in size.

How it makes them: The process to print a map is somewhat similar to  that of printing a newspaper, though more care is taken to ensure color quality. After the map has been drafted, a photograph is made of it. The negative is used to make an aluminum plate for the printing press. Chemicals on the plate help color to be distributed on the press as desired.

How much it makes: company executives could not give a specific number of maps produced, but with more than 900 clients typically making large orders, output is easily in tens of millions. Williams & Heintz generated more than $6 million in revenue in 1996, said Mark Budd, the company’s treasurer and secretary.

Where to find them: Clients include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and several state topographical and geological-survey agencies. Williams & Heintz maps can also be found along Virginia highways; tje company won a one-year contract to print 3.75 million copies of the 1996-97 map passed out at rest stops. The 37-employee company also recently won the road map contracts with New York and North Carolina.

The niche: The company began with four former employees of the U. S. Geologic Survey in 1921. After many years at Third and I street NE, Williams & Heintz moved to Capitol Heights in 1958.

One of a small number of dedicated map printers in North America, Williams & Heintz likes to distinguish itself with “intelligent folding” maps. Until about 15 years ago, most road maps were given out or sold at nominal cost. As a result, they were cheaply made, and user-friendly attributes were not a priority, Mr. Budd said. After customers showed a willingness to pay for quality maps, the company invested $500,000 in a self-designed folding machine to create road maps that fold up easily in an accordion style.

“Easy-folding maps have been in Europe and Asia for nearly a hundred years,” Mr. Budd said. “It’s only started in the last few years here. But it’s caught on like wildfire.”

Nautical Charts for your Phone and Tablet

How would you like your map? Paper or plastic? Folded or flat? On the wall or on your computer screen? How about on your phone or tablet?

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. specializes in printing large paper and plastic maps.  We sometimes publish too.  We publish the Maryland Cruising Guide and Virginia Cruising Guide, nautical chart books of the navigable waters of Maryland and Virginia.

This year the new printed chart book will come with links to take you to an App, so that you can have the Williams & Heintz Cruising Guides on your iPhone, iPad, or Android phone too. The digital charts, for your phone or tablet, are free with the purchase of the Virginia or Maryland cruising Guides.  You can also purchase individual charts separately.

It’s easy:

First, install Avenza’s FREE PDF Maps App. It is available from I-Tunes or Google Play or at http://www.pdf-maps.com/get-pdf-maps.

There are three ways to download the charts:

  • Open the app and search Maryland Cruising Guide
  • Use the codes for the free charts that come in the new 2014-2015 Williams & Heintz Cruising Guides
  • Go the the Williams & Heintz Cruising Guide web site to  scan the QR code that corresponds to the chart you wish to download.

Printed paper maps will always be part of  mapping.  The App is not replacing printed products; it complements the printed charts. The app has functionality for locating (via GPS), measuring, plotting points, importing and exporting points.  This spatially referenced map shows exactly where you are. And with the paper chart, you know where you’re going.

Oh, You’re a Map Printer, I’m So Sorry!

“Oh, you’re a map printer, I’m so sorry!”

That’s the kind of response I frequently hear when I tell people what I do.  They see all the GPS and cell phone map apps and think only of road maps that they don’t know how to read.

Well there are a lot of other kinds of maps out there to print, besides road maps. Here are a few, click on the tiles below to see the larger image and a little bit about them.

Williams & Heintz prints many different kinds of maps and charts

Williams & Heintz prints many different kinds of maps and charts

Here’s another thing, all those different kinds of maps were printed over 30 years ago, made by hand, with cameras and film. I scanned them off an old Williams & Heintz marketing piece; so old it doesn’t even have anything about a web site or email contact.

Just think what we can do now with computers, the internet, available data, and digital mapping tools!  (more about that in a later post)

All these new tools make cartography and map making more available, to many more people, to publish more maps.

And some of these great maps  even make it to print on paper.

When you want to see the big picture, nothing beats a big map on a big piece of paper.

It’s a great time to be a map printer!

More about map printing paper specifications

Determining the size of your map

Choosing Ink Colors

Communicating with your printer for best map design

Map finishing and folding

Big, 40” x 60” Print of the Beautiful, New USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map. Genuine Offset Lithography!

I have just launched a Kickstarter project to print the New USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map.

New USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map

New USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1391435578/lithographic-print-of-the-new-usda-plant-hardiness

We think it’s a beautiful map, and can’t be fully appreciated on a screen.It deserves to be seen at full size: A big, 40 x 60 inch print of the beautiful, new  USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map, printed by genuine offset lithography!

Kickstarter is a new way to fund creative projects: I have set a funding goal and deadline for my project. If you like the project, please pledge money to make it happen. I am excited by the possibilities of crowd sourced funding for creative map projects. Print and digital are both improved when used together. Funding on Kickstarter is all-or-nothing — projects must reach their funding goals to receive any money.

Backers of the project will receive the a big, 40 x 60 inch print of the beautiful, new USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map, printed with genuine offset lithography.

Update: This Kickstarter project was successfully funded and printed. We have a few left. Let me know if you want one.

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation Receives MDOT Minority Business Enterprise Certification as a Woman Owned Business

Press Release

Capitol Heights, MD, July 8, 2013:  Williams & Heintz Map Corporation, a specialist in map printing, production, and folding, is pleased to announce that it has received certification as a Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) from The Maryland Department of Transportation’s (MDOT) Office of Minority Business Enterprise (OMBE).

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation has been printing maps for entrepreneurs, government agencies, and map publishers since 1921. They combine the highest quality pre-press, printing, folding with industry leading knowledge and customer service.

“We are excited to be officially certified as a Minority Business Enterprise for Commercial Printing and Support Activities for Printing. We look forward to the opportunities that certification will bring,” said Holly Heintz Budd, President and CEO of Williams & Heintz Map Corporation.

MDOT’s OMBE is Maryland’s Official Certification agency. They have one of the most stringent certification processes in the U.S. To be eligible for certification as an MBE firm, a business must be at least 51% owned and controlled by one or more socially-and economically-disadvantaged individuals, including women. MDOT has a comprehensive certification process to determine the ownership and control of firms. Only certified firms are eligible to fulfill minority participation goals on contracts issued by the state of Maryland.

For additional information about Williams & Heintz Map Corporation, please visit www.whmap.com

For additional information about The Maryland Department of Transportation’s (MDOT) Office of Minority Business Enterprise (OMBE), visit http://www.mdot.maryland.gov

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation

A Peek Inside Williams & Heintz Map Corporation

We have a new video for our map printing company, Williams & Heintz Map Corporation. Hope you enjoy the quick look at the people who expertly print your maps.

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation is a map printer. We have been printing maps for entrepreneurs, government agencies, and map publishers since 1921. We combine the highest quality map pre-press, map printing, and map folding with  industry leading knowledge, and customer service.

There is a special craft to printing and folding maps, different from any other sheet fed work. Maps have unique challenges when it comes to color balance and registration.  At Williams & Heintz, our craftsmen have the most experience in the business of printing maps and they know how to meet these challenges.

Experienced cartographic technicians prepare your maps for printing with an assortment of graphic and GIS software,  integrating data with accompanying text, graphics, photographs, logos, street indexes and tables into a clean, publication-quality layout.

Skilled pressmen print maps as large as 47 ¼ ” x 63”, on a wide selection of paper stocks, including high wet strength and plastic. Our presses that print up to 6 colors in one pass. We are specialists at printing oversize sheets.

The in-house bindery team folds maps in many configurations, including user-friendly styles that can be leafed through like the pages of a book. We can fold anything we can print. We can make 16 parallel accordion folds, up to 44 inched wide, on what may be the largest map folder in the world, uniquely configured for us!

Knowledgeable consultants help you design and produce your map, using ecologically sustainable materials and methods. We welcome your difficult reproduction problems and complex technical maps as well as simpler jobs. All will get the same care and attention to detail that maps require.

Experience, quality, and great customer service with over 92 years of in the business can be found here at Williams and Heintz Map Corporation…

From the Map Vault: Atlanta Tax Maps 1930

Atlanta 1930 Map Corner with Williams & Heintz Co.

Atlanta 1930 Map Corner with Williams & Heintz Co.

Over on our facebook page, Williams & Heintz has a new “like”, and it came with the most Awesome link!  Jack Kittle, of  Decatur, Georgia, found 1927-1930 topographic maps of Atlanta.  Our name is listed in the lower right hand corner.  Here is the link, that will take you to the Digital Gallery at Emory University. They have 75 pages of the City of Atlanta tax plat maps that we printed when my great grandfather first got into the map printing business.

Company lore has it that, one of our original jobs as a map company was engraving, (copper plate), and printing, (stone lithography), tax plats for cities, of which Atlanta was one. Without accurate maps, the cities were losing revenue, because they didn’t know who to send the bill to.

Jack Says, “I first ran into copies of these maps at the DeKalb History Center. Their copies are from the DeKalb County Planning Department. New developments – streets and buildings – were carefully added in black ink until sometime in the 1950s. This fits the tax plat scenario. Note that this usage was not in the City of Atlanta, rather in the area to the east.”

Read more:

A Quick Look at Williams & Heintz Map Corp. in Map Printing History.

What Role Have Women Played in the History of Mapmaking?

MARBL Historic Map Collection: City of Atlanta: Sheet 7 Printed by Williams & Heintz Co. in 1930.

Collection: MARBL Historic Map Collection
Identifier: 07_300dpi
Title: City of Atlanta: Sheet 7
Creator: U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey
Publisher: U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey and City of Atlanta Mapping Division
Date: 1930
Description: Color map showing Associated Reform Presbyterian Church, Druid Hills Baptist Church, Druid Hills Presbyterian Church and Springdale Park.
Scale: 2400
Projection: Polyconic
Dimensions: 47 x 39 cm.
Format: image/jpeg
Type: Atlas Map
Country: United States
State or Province: Georgia
County: Fulton County; Dekalb County
City: Atlanta
Full Title: City of Atlanta: Sheet 7. Construction Department, William A. Hansell, Chief; S.P. Floore, Topographic Engineeer in charge. Topography by W.H. Manley. Control by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey and City of Atlanta Mapping Division. Surveyed in 1928. Williams & Heintz Co., Wash, D.C.
Publication Title: Atlas of Atlanta and Vicinity, 1928
Publication Type: City Atlas
Publication Date: 1930
Institution: Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.
Rights: The City of Atlanta has granted Emory University, Woodruff Library, permission to digitize, distribute, display and geo-reference maps produced by the U.S. Coast Guard and Geodetic Survey and the City of Altanta Mapping Division in a 1928 survey published as the Atlas of Atlanta and VIcinity. Emory may digitize, display, and georeference the maps in electronic formats, including free public access to maps on the web. The City of Atlanta does not attest to the accuracy of the image. The Maps Content, including all images and text, are for personal, educational, and non-commercial use only.

International Women’s day is March 8 and March is Women’s History Month – What Role Have Women Played in the History of Mapmaking?

Many women’s organizations and governments around the world observe International Women’s Day annually on March 8th. The United States designates the whole month of March as Women’s History Month.  The role of women in the history of mapmaking reminds us to celebrate the accomplishments of women and girls throughout history, and the need to keep working to ensure that women’s equality is gained and maintained in all aspects of life, all over the map.

Judith Tyner, Professor Emerita of Geography, California State University, Long Beach, has researched and shared a lot of the history of women in cartography. She says that Women have played many roles in the history of cartography. There are the usual assumptions, marginal activities, traditional woman’s roles of piece work that could be done at home: coloring maps,  map folding, and stitching atlases. In the 19th century, women taught geography, maps, and “the use of the globes” to privileged young ladies.  The usual way that women would become involved in mapmaking business, was through family. The map trades, printing, and engraving have traditionally been family businesses.

But when you examine maps for the names of engravers, publishers and printers, you discover that women have been involved in cartography from the early days of mapping.   Women were publishers, map sellers, cartographers, drafters, editors, engravers, globemakers, printers, colorists, folders, stitchers, teachers of map reading and mapmaking, cartographic historians, map librarians, and patrons of cartography!

“By the beginning of the twentieth century, the identities of cartographers and map traders had become even more obscure.  Large cartographic firms such as Rand McNally and Hammond formed and began using wax engraving and lithography techniques; map engravers and compilers no longer signed their maps. As companies grew, few retained records… Over time old records were destroyed in the name of efficiency.”

This fits with what I have recently learned about Williams & Heintz, from my cousin Jeanette Schuder, about my Great Aunt Ruth, Born Ruth Lillian Heintz (1913 – 2011)

“Her father co-owned the William and Heintz Company, a lithographic business in DC.  She worked for her dad’s company as a topographical engineer and she drew maps of Bakersfield, California and other new cities.  She also worked for the Geological Survey and drew the original maps of the unmapped territory of the Yukon.”

Ruth was married August 22, 1936, so I figure that her work as a mapmaker was in the early 1930s.  A quick google search for “Bakersfield CA map 1930s” yields  these maps, from the University of Texas Libraries, that may be some of the maps that she worked on.

Bakersfield CA Quad USGS Edition of 1906 Reprint 1936

Avawatz Mountains CA USGS 1933

Even before the second World War, women were encouraged to work as cartographers and cartographic drafters.  During the war, they were hired to replace the men, due to the wartime demand for maps. Government agencies in the U. S. were hiring women because they recognized that our maps were out of date and had insufficient coverage. Women were preferred for drafting, computing and photogrametry. Collections were scattered. Map librarians played an important role in the collection and distribution of maps for the war effort.

Women did not give up cartography after the war. They were successful, and continued to take advantage of trainings  at universities, and job opportunities. Marie Tharp was encouraged to study geology and drafting, she made important contributions to mapping. You can  read about them in  Honoring Marie Tharp, Oceanographic Cartographer, for International Women’s Day

and

How Do You Map the Ocean Floor? A review of the book, Soundings: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor, by Hali Felt

Today, women work in all aspects of the mapping industry, from GIS to map printing. Since World War II, we have seen the greatest rise in the number of women involved in the field.  However, continued vigilance and action is still necessary to ensure that women’s equality is gained and maintained.

Mary Beth Smith, of “Girls Who Print” said, in response to an example of blatant discrimination in the work place today,

” Lets work together. Let the ignorant know that their behavior is neither admired nor tolerated. Show your spouses, your daughters, your sons, and everyone in your orbit your conviction that this is unacceptable behavior. Isn’t it time we stopped acting like this doesn’t happen? Do we not WANT young people and women to bring their gifts, talents, training and expertise to an industry sorely in need of a fresh approach?”

References:

Tyner, Judith, “The Hidden Cartographers: Women in Mapmaking,” Mercator’s World, volume 2, number 6, November/December 1997, pp. 46-51.

Tyner, Judith, “Millie the Mapper and Beyond: The Role of Women in Cartography Since World War II,” Meridian – Map and Geography Round Table of the American Library Association No. 15 1999  pp23-28.

Thanks Judith!

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