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Williams & Heintz Map Helps You Print Smart for International Print Day16

Use #PrintSmart on social media to learn about all the great things that you can do with print in International Print Day, October, 19, 2016

Use #PrintSmart and #IPD16 on social media to learn about all the great things that you can do with print on International Print Day, October, 19, 2016

Happy International Print Day!

This year the International Print Day theme is Print Smart. #PrintSmart is all about sharing education and resources for learning about how wonderfully relevant print is in the digital age.

At Williams & Heintz Map Corporation, we would like to share some Map Printing Tips. Our map printing tips were originally published as a series of posts when we first started our blog. We answer frequently asked questions about Map Pre-Press, Map Printing, and Map Folding.

Map Printing FAQ

How do I choose the paper for my map?

How do I  decide on the size of my map?

How do I choose ink colors for my map?

What do I need to consider about Map folding and finishing?

Is it important to ask questions and communicate with my printer?

 

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Capitol Heights Printer Has Future Mapped Out

So much stays the same and so much changes! This article by Eric Fisher, was originally published in the Washington Times/Business Times February 10, 1997

We still print and fold maps for a wide variety of government agencies, publishers, and entrepreneurs. However how we make the maps has certainly changed since 1997!

Prepress is mostly digital now. Although as much as 10% of our work is still film based. We can still edit, proof, and print from film. The man-hours involved, to edit and update a film job, can be much less than the thousands of man-hours required to digitize a whole new map. We can even combine digital correction copy with film based layers.

 

Richard Heintz, grandson of the firm's founder, son-in-law Mark Budd examine a fresh map of the world.

Richard Heintz, grandson of the firm’s founder, son-in-law Mark Budd examine a fresh map of the world.

Made in Washington

Producer: Williams & Heintz

What It Makes: This 76 year-old Capitol Heights company prints a variety of maps, from detailed, government-issued nautical and geologic maps to folded road maps for companies such as Michelin and Alexandria’s ADC. Williams & Heintz specializes in maps up to 47 inches by 63 inches in size.

How it makes them: The process to print a map is somewhat similar to  that of printing a newspaper, though more care is taken to ensure color quality. After the map has been drafted, a photograph is made of it. The negative is used to make an aluminum plate for the printing press. Chemicals on the plate help color to be distributed on the press as desired.

How much it makes: company executives could not give a specific number of maps produced, but with more than 900 clients typically making large orders, output is easily in tens of millions. Williams & Heintz generated more than $6 million in revenue in 1996, said Mark Budd, the company’s treasurer and secretary.

Where to find them: Clients include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and several state topographical and geological-survey agencies. Williams & Heintz maps can also be found along Virginia highways; tje company won a one-year contract to print 3.75 million copies of the 1996-97 map passed out at rest stops. The 37-employee company also recently won the road map contracts with New York and North Carolina.

The niche: The company began with four former employees of the U. S. Geologic Survey in 1921. After many years at Third and I street NE, Williams & Heintz moved to Capitol Heights in 1958.

One of a small number of dedicated map printers in North America, Williams & Heintz likes to distinguish itself with “intelligent folding” maps. Until about 15 years ago, most road maps were given out or sold at nominal cost. As a result, they were cheaply made, and user-friendly attributes were not a priority, Mr. Budd said. After customers showed a willingness to pay for quality maps, the company invested $500,000 in a self-designed folding machine to create road maps that fold up easily in an accordion style.

“Easy-folding maps have been in Europe and Asia for nearly a hundred years,” Mr. Budd said. “It’s only started in the last few years here. But it’s caught on like wildfire.”

A Peek Inside Williams & Heintz Map Corporation

We have a new video for our map printing company, Williams & Heintz Map Corporation. Hope you enjoy the quick look at the people who expertly print your maps.

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation is a map printer. We have been printing maps for entrepreneurs, government agencies, and map publishers since 1921. We combine the highest quality map pre-press, map printing, and map folding with  industry leading knowledge, and customer service.

There is a special craft to printing and folding maps, different from any other sheet fed work. Maps have unique challenges when it comes to color balance and registration.  At Williams & Heintz, our craftsmen have the most experience in the business of printing maps and they know how to meet these challenges.

Experienced cartographic technicians prepare your maps for printing with an assortment of graphic and GIS software,  integrating data with accompanying text, graphics, photographs, logos, street indexes and tables into a clean, publication-quality layout.

Skilled pressmen print maps as large as 47 ¼ ” x 63”, on a wide selection of paper stocks, including high wet strength and plastic. Our presses that print up to 6 colors in one pass. We are specialists at printing oversize sheets.

The in-house bindery team folds maps in many configurations, including user-friendly styles that can be leafed through like the pages of a book. We can fold anything we can print. We can make 16 parallel accordion folds, up to 44 inched wide, on what may be the largest map folder in the world, uniquely configured for us!

Knowledgeable consultants help you design and produce your map, using ecologically sustainable materials and methods. We welcome your difficult reproduction problems and complex technical maps as well as simpler jobs. All will get the same care and attention to detail that maps require.

Experience, quality, and great customer service with over 92 years of in the business can be found here at Williams and Heintz Map Corporation…

International Women’s day is March 8 and March is Women’s History Month – What Role Have Women Played in the History of Mapmaking?

Many women’s organizations and governments around the world observe International Women’s Day annually on March 8th. The United States designates the whole month of March as Women’s History Month.  The role of women in the history of mapmaking reminds us to celebrate the accomplishments of women and girls throughout history, and the need to keep working to ensure that women’s equality is gained and maintained in all aspects of life, all over the map.

Judith Tyner, Professor Emerita of Geography, California State University, Long Beach, has researched and shared a lot of the history of women in cartography. She says that Women have played many roles in the history of cartography. There are the usual assumptions, marginal activities, traditional woman’s roles of piece work that could be done at home: coloring maps,  map folding, and stitching atlases. In the 19th century, women taught geography, maps, and “the use of the globes” to privileged young ladies.  The usual way that women would become involved in mapmaking business, was through family. The map trades, printing, and engraving have traditionally been family businesses.

But when you examine maps for the names of engravers, publishers and printers, you discover that women have been involved in cartography from the early days of mapping.   Women were publishers, map sellers, cartographers, drafters, editors, engravers, globemakers, printers, colorists, folders, stitchers, teachers of map reading and mapmaking, cartographic historians, map librarians, and patrons of cartography!

“By the beginning of the twentieth century, the identities of cartographers and map traders had become even more obscure.  Large cartographic firms such as Rand McNally and Hammond formed and began using wax engraving and lithography techniques; map engravers and compilers no longer signed their maps. As companies grew, few retained records… Over time old records were destroyed in the name of efficiency.”

This fits with what I have recently learned about Williams & Heintz, from my cousin Jeanette Schuder, about my Great Aunt Ruth, Born Ruth Lillian Heintz (1913 – 2011)

“Her father co-owned the William and Heintz Company, a lithographic business in DC.  She worked for her dad’s company as a topographical engineer and she drew maps of Bakersfield, California and other new cities.  She also worked for the Geological Survey and drew the original maps of the unmapped territory of the Yukon.”

Ruth was married August 22, 1936, so I figure that her work as a mapmaker was in the early 1930s.  A quick google search for “Bakersfield CA map 1930s” yields  these maps, from the University of Texas Libraries, that may be some of the maps that she worked on.

Bakersfield CA Quad USGS Edition of 1906 Reprint 1936

Avawatz Mountains CA USGS 1933

Even before the second World War, women were encouraged to work as cartographers and cartographic drafters.  During the war, they were hired to replace the men, due to the wartime demand for maps. Government agencies in the U. S. were hiring women because they recognized that our maps were out of date and had insufficient coverage. Women were preferred for drafting, computing and photogrametry. Collections were scattered. Map librarians played an important role in the collection and distribution of maps for the war effort.

Women did not give up cartography after the war. They were successful, and continued to take advantage of trainings  at universities, and job opportunities. Marie Tharp was encouraged to study geology and drafting, she made important contributions to mapping. You can  read about them in  Honoring Marie Tharp, Oceanographic Cartographer, for International Women’s Day

and

How Do You Map the Ocean Floor? A review of the book, Soundings: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor, by Hali Felt

Today, women work in all aspects of the mapping industry, from GIS to map printing. Since World War II, we have seen the greatest rise in the number of women involved in the field.  However, continued vigilance and action is still necessary to ensure that women’s equality is gained and maintained.

Mary Beth Smith, of “Girls Who Print” said, in response to an example of blatant discrimination in the work place today,

” Lets work together. Let the ignorant know that their behavior is neither admired nor tolerated. Show your spouses, your daughters, your sons, and everyone in your orbit your conviction that this is unacceptable behavior. Isn’t it time we stopped acting like this doesn’t happen? Do we not WANT young people and women to bring their gifts, talents, training and expertise to an industry sorely in need of a fresh approach?”

References:

Tyner, Judith, “The Hidden Cartographers: Women in Mapmaking,” Mercator’s World, volume 2, number 6, November/December 1997, pp. 46-51.

Tyner, Judith, “Millie the Mapper and Beyond: The Role of Women in Cartography Since World War II,” Meridian – Map and Geography Round Table of the American Library Association No. 15 1999  pp23-28.

Thanks Judith!

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation Joins Two Sides to Help Promote the Sustainability of Print and Paper

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. joins Two Sides U. S.  Print and paper have a great environmental story to tell.

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. is now a member of Two Sides U.S., a 501(c)6 non-profit organization that promotes the responsible production, use and unique sustainable features of print and paper.

People depend on paper maps for many purposes, not the least of which is to get them where they need to go.  We want everyone to understand the renewable, recyclable nature of print on paper and have the confidence that a printed map is not only very useful, but also highly sustainable.   Williams and Heintz is pleased to join Two Sides in getting that message out and in promoting the medium’s responsible production and use.

We know the importance of building and maintaining a cleaner environment and aim to contribute in as many ways as possible throughout our map production, map printing, and map folding.

Two sides U. S. has an excellent blog, where Phil Riebel, President and COO, Two Sides U.S., Inc. does a great job examining the issues and providing  factual, accurate, and science-based information on the sustainability of print and paper.

Seasons Greetings with Paper Snowflakes: a New Way to Fold a Map

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. is decorated for the season with giant paper snowflakes made of maps.

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. is decorated for the season with giant paper snowflakes made of maps.

Season’s Greetings!

I have taken the time out to do something creative, a release from the stress of the season and political climate:  to make something beautiful in response to the sorrowful news in Connecticut.

My wish is to share some joy with you.

Williams & Heintz Map Corp. is decorated for the season with giant paper snowflakes made of maps.  I have made a “how to” video, so you and your family can fold six sided snowflakes too.  Don’t forget to recycle your paper scraps.

Below is the invitation from the Connecticut PTSA, and the PTA and community leaders in Newtown and Sandy Hook Elementary. to make snowflakes, to create a winter wonderland for when the Sandy Hook children return to school in January.

Snowflakes for Sandy Hook:   Please help the students of Sandy Hook have a winter wonderland at their new school! Get Creative!! No two snowflakes are alike. Make and send snowflakes to Connecticut PTSA, 60 Connolly Parkway, Building 12, Suite 103, Hamden, CT 06514, by January 12, 2013.From the Connecticut PTSA.

Yours,

Holly

More re-used map decorations found herehere, and here.

Update:  They have enough snowflakes and cannot accept any more.

Thank you to everyone who has donated snowflakes on behalf of the children of Sandy Hook  Elementary School and the community of Newtown. We know that each snowflake represents the emotional outreach of the person making it. We have been overwhelmed by the outpouring of generosity from around not just the country but the world. At this time, we have enough beautiful snowflakes to blanket the community of Newtown. Therefore, with regret we must close the snowflake project to further donations. Please take this idea and your snowflakes and create a winter wonderland of your own in your community as a show of solidarity for our Newtown families. Please share your winter wonderlands with us. We would love to share your pictures with the families of Sandy Hook and all the other participating communities. Also please read the message below from the PTA of the Sandy Hook Elementary School for another wonderful way to help. Thank you for your heartfelt and amazing creations and for all of your magnificent notes and kind wishes for the Newtown community.

Ohio Scenic Rivers Map, Best of Category Award of Excellence at the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic (PGAMA) 2012 Excellence in Print Award

Map of Little Miami River in Ohio printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process

Williams & Heintz Map attended the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic (PGAMA) 2012 Excellence in Print Awards Gala on March 23rd. Our maps were finalists in the map category, winning Awards of Excellence.

Our printing and folding of the Ohio Scenic Rivers Map, for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process!

The print quality of everything entered was excellent, so it must have been the tricky map folding that won the award.  The 55 inch x 8 ½ inch piece is 15 panels that first accordion fold. Then, the last two folds wrap around, resulting in a short fold on the cover.   We had to feed it tail first.   The final size is 8 ½ inches x 3 ¾ inches.

Here is a link to my previous post with map folding and finishing tips.

This map was featured in a  post about QR Codes.

The Little Miami River is designated as an Ohio State and National Scenic River.  It has breathtaking vistas and scenery and a rich history. The Little Miami River and its watershed support an abundant variety of plants and animals.

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River 55 x 8 ½ printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp. for the Ohio DNR, won the Best of Category Award of Excellence for Folders and Brochures, Process

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River Map Accordian folds then last 2 folds wrap

Ohio DNR Little Miami River Map printed by Williams & Heintz Map Corp

Little Miami River Map Help Protect Ohio's Scenic Rivers

Ohio Scenic Rivers Little Miami River folds to 8 ½ x 3 ¾

Finishing Your Map

This map folds to a convenient pocket size.

Determining how the map folds, panel sizes, and placement of cover panels should be an integral part of planning the map.  The objective is to develop a folding sequence that provides the greatest ease of use for the person trying to read it.  The exception to this is where advertising is paramount.  In these cases, the user is made to go past all the ads before they can get to the map.  If the image goes right to the edge of the sheet this “bleed edge” should extend 1/8” beyond the trim to allow for variation in cutting.  Panels/images that fold out, should wrap around the fold edge 1/16” to accommodate variation in folding.  If you’re printing on plastic, where the variation increases, you might consider 3/32” for a wrap.

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