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Print Maps Give you the Big Picture-There’s Nothing like It Online

Williams & Heintz Map won a Q Award from the Printing and Graphics Association Mid-Atlantic, (PGAMA) for printing one of Hedberg Maps. The American Higher Education Map shows the location of every university and college in the country.

Williams & Heintz Map won a 2017 Q Award from the Printing and Graphics Association Mid-Atlantic, (PGAMA) for printing Tom Hedberg’s College Map. The American Higher Education Map shows the location of every university and college in the country.

I love reading about maps in the news, especially printed maps. So, I was pleased to see this article in the Star Tribune about Tom Hedberg: Who needs GPS and Google? Minneapolis map publisher is ‘master of cartography’.

s article starts out with a great example of  Tom Hedberg’s creative and useful maps.

Sure, your phone is a great navigation tool.

But can it show you all of the dog-friendly breweries in the Twin Cities? The location, times and what’s playing for the Music & Movies program in Minneapolis parks? Or display at a glance where every college, minor-league ballpark or airport in the country is located?

You can have that information at your fingertips thanks to a Minneapolis man named Tom Hedberg.

 At a time when we increasingly rely on GPS to tell us our place in the world, Hedberg is still doing navigation the old-fashioned way — making maps, not apps.

Maps, as you may recall, are big pieces of paper, often folded in a complicated accordion pattern, that everyone used to keep in the glove boxes of their car.

Earlier this year, Williams & Heintz Map won a Q Award from the Printing and Graphics Association Mid-Atlantic, (PGAMA) for printing one of Hedberg Maps. The American Higher Education Map shows the location of every university and college in the country.

The Star Tribune article includes a quote from Sue Luse, an Eagan-based consultant to students planning college applications.

“I haven’t found anything else like it online, I give them to every single one of my clients.”

Chin 

Thank you Tom Hedberg, for choosing Williams & Heintz to print your maps so that we can win prizes! Definitely read the article if you are into maps. It go into detail about the changing business of maps, as GPS and google grab up market share. Like me,

Hedberg is optimistic. He likens his maps to LP records, saying they won’t completely disappear because they’ll always appeal to a niche audience.

That’s partly because paper maps won’t break or run out of batteries. They can unfold to a view of the world more expansive than the screen of even the largest cellphone.

“Paper is a really good hard-copy backup,” said Andy Mickel, a Minneapolis software developer who buys Hedberg paper maps and atlases. “Sometimes it’s good to stare at the big picture.”

Williams & Heintz Map Drops the “S”

Williams & Heintz Map Corporation announced it was removing the seemingly superfluous “s” from its name, thereby becoming “William Heintz Map”. It admitted that it had long been fighting a “losing battle” against people who didn’t understand why the extra ‘s’ was there, and it had finally decided to “give up”. The ampersand was also removed because so many people thought that the company was just named after the past President, William Heintz.

The map printer acquired its name when they moved to 8119 Central Ave. in Capitol Heights, Maryland and incorporated on July 1, 1959 as Williams & Heintz Map Corporation. However, evidence suggested that Mr Williams left the business sometime in the 1940s. The current owners if this family business are are 4th generation and never met Mr. Williams.

Much of this article was shamelessly copied from an earlier article.

  • In 1921, the Williams-Webb Company, Inc. was incorporated in Washington, D. C. The Corporation’s main office was located  at 1702-1704 “F” Street, N. W.
  • The Williams-Webb Co. Inc. Changed its name to Williams & Heintz Co. Inc. in 1927.
  • From 1930 to 1958: W & H located at 220 Eye St., NE, Washington D.C., near Union Station.
  • The company changed its name to the Williams & Heintz Lithographic Corporation in 1951.
  • Williams & Heintz Lithographic Corp. built the current operating facility in Maryland and moved into it in 1958.
  • Williams & Heintz Lithographic Corp. was disbanded in Washington D. C., and incorporated in Maryland on July 1, 1959 as Williams & Heintz Map Corporation.

 

 

 

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