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The Map Experience

What if you had never seen a printed map? What if all you only knew about was electronic devices? This tongue in cheek video is an introduction to “a new bio-optical knowledge recording and dissemination system, responding to the trade name: Map.”

Created by The Regional Centre for Geographic Information Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur (CRIGE  PACA).   It was shown during  meeting, a conference called SIG La Lettre.

Watch the video which helps you to understand “the use of maps.” It is full of great information about map features like:

“Here’s how it works:  Map  consists of a large window,  integrated in a flexible cellulose pad, and compressed hundreds of times, thanks to the FUF technology:  folding/unfolding.

“Map” is able of storing millions of information bits, which are then optically scanned, and thus directly transmitted to the brain.

Thanks to a particularly ergonomic navigation interface, based on an intuitive forearm supination and pronation mechanism, pans, zooms and rotations are performed without image degradation, smoothly, with a refresh rate of a few picoseconds.

It has a 100% toutchpad allowing simultaneous use of 10 fingers.

Color stability is perfect, whatever the light conditions.”

In Today’s world of security worries, the Map video playfully reminds us, without a direct comparison to our digital devices, that that people are not likely to steal your map on the subway and:

“Map” respects users’ privacy:  impossible to hack, and without any antivirus or firewall, annotations are locally stored and never sent to any server.

And “Map” is unbreakable!

Finally, the video reminds us that a print map is great for decorating, and is a recyclable, sustainable,  product.

Happy watching!  (Link here)
Map is an unprecedented technological revolution:  Without cables, without electronics, without connection, compact, convertible and portable. “Map” can be used everywhere: at home, at the office, in the car, by bicycle, horseback riding, even in extreme cold! “Map” is available at any time… without battery, nor socket. “Map” does not crash ever. “Map” does not need to be reset nor updated. “Map” can also prevent an unwanted encounter.

‘Map is an unprecedented technological revolution: Without cables, without electronics, without connection, compact, convertible and portable.
“Map” can be used everywhere: at home, at the office, in the car, by bicycle, horseback riding, even in extreme cold!
“Map” is available at any time… without battery, nor socket.
“Map” does not crash ever.
“Map” does not need to be reset nor updated.
“Map” can also prevent an unwanted encounter.’

I want to print a map. How do I determine the specifications?

The first thing to be considered when printing a map is the end-user.  A thoughtful examination of how people will use the map will help determine a majority of the specifications that define the product.  Incorporation of these elements will insure the end users interest in the product.

To decide what kind of paper will be best for your map, ask yourself:  Where will people use the map?

W&H Cruising Guide printed on wet strength paper

Nautical chart printed on wet strength paper

Will it be exposed to the elements?   If so, a wet strength stock, or better, a printable plastic would be best suited.  High Wet Strength papers retain 40% of their tensile strength when wet.  It is, however, an uncoated printing surface and is therefore subject to considerable dot gain which can greatly diminish the appearance of graphics.  In particular photos that were dark to start with will get a lot darker resulting in a loss of detail.

Plastics, synthetic sheets, have the surface characteristics of a matte coated stock which is far superior in print quality, to uncoated.  They are impervious to moisture, and have a folding endurance that greatly exceeds any paper.  If you are designing your map for extended use, plastic is great for a durable, long-lasting map. They are also more expensive; although the public seems more than willing to pay for the improved quality and performance.  Plastic is rarely used on a give-away product.  Plastic is specified by thickness not weight.

Shiny paper, such as gloss or dull-coated stocks have excellent print quality.  Unfortunately they are prone to cracking when folded, and hence are better suited to use in book products or maps that don’t get folded.  Gloss stocks are used in folded maps but normally only when the primary purpose of the map is advertising sales.  In these cases print quality takes precedence over functionality.

Will the map be hung on the wall or folded?  If the map is intended to remain flat and get hung on a wall, a heavy weight stock would be of benefit to reduce sagging.   A 100 lb. stock would be a good choice for a flat map destined for a wall.  Most folded maps are printed on 50 to 60 lb. stock.  Generally the larger the map, the thinner and lighter the paper needs to be to accommodate folding.

The weight of the stock is determined by the weight of 500 sheets at the basis size.  Although there are numerous other categories, most paper can be described as cover weight or text weight, with the cover stocks being the thicker and heavier ones.    The basis size of cover stock is 20 x 26 inches.  Text stock is 25 x 38 inches.  Hence, a 60 lb. text stock is one in which 500 sheets of 25 x 38 paper weighs 60 lbs.

A way to achieve multiple uses of a map would be to run multiple paper stocks at time of printing.  It should be noted, however, that multiple paper surfaces will result in multiple appearances.

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